Brockhouse. Brock is an old word for the badger, still widely current in country speech up to the end of the nineteenth century and appearing in literature, and hence in good dictionaries, including bilinguals. So there is not much excuse for the Dutch and Swedish translators’ having misrendered it. In the Dutch translation Broekhuis (not a misprint, since it is repeated in the four places where this
name occurs) seems absurd: what is a ‘breech-house’? The Swedish Galthus ‘wild-boar house’ is not much better, since swine do not burrow!
Only Tolkien would burn a translator like this. From his guide to names in translation, which is a singular treasure trove.

"The flea communicated to Mr. Blake what passed, as related to himself, at the Creation. ‘It was first intended,’ said he (the flea) ‘to make me as big as a bullock; but then when it was considered from my construction, so armed—and so powerful withal, that in proportion to my bulk, (mischievous as I now am) that I should have been a too mighty destroyer; it was determined to make me—no bigger than I am.”

William Blake’s Ghost of a Flea, based on a genuine vision of this monster and its “face worthy of a murderer.”

"The flea communicated to Mr. Blake what passed, as related to himself, at the Creation. ‘It was first intended,’ said he (the flea) ‘to make me as big as a bullock; but then when it was considered from my construction, so armed—and so powerful withal, that in proportion to my bulk, (mischievous as I now am) that I should have been a too mighty destroyer; it was determined to make me—no bigger than I am.”

William Blake’s Ghost of a Flea, based on a genuine vision of this monster and its “face worthy of a murderer.”

Hubble, I would kiss you and your four-year time-lapse all day. 

This previously inconspicuous star underwent an outburst early in 2002, during which it temporarily increased in brightness to become 600,000 times more luminous than our Sun. Light from this sudden eruption is illuminating the interstellar dust surrounding the star, producing the most spectacular “light echo” in the history of astronomy.

Hubble, I would kiss you and your four-year time-lapse all day. 

This previously inconspicuous star underwent an outburst early in 2002, during which it temporarily increased in brightness to become 600,000 times more luminous than our Sun. Light from this sudden eruption is illuminating the interstellar dust surrounding the star, producing the most spectacular “light echo” in the history of astronomy.